For Parents

 

Moving with kids

Packing for your move

Moving checklist

 

Moving with pets

Single Parents

Child Care

 
Moving with kids
Even when parents are excited and happy about moving, children of all ages experience some degree of stress. A positive attitude will go a long way in helping  your children receive the news of a move. Ask them for their feelings and listen carefully to both negative and positive thoughts. Be understanding and patient about their misgivings and hesitations. Try and take the children with you to visit your new neighborhood prior to the actual move.
 
Each age group will react to Infants are probably the easiest to move. Try to maintain their general routine so their schedules are not greatly upset. Ask your agent for a list of reliable babysitters in your new neighborhood. the move with different concerns:
 
Preschoolers will find the move troubling especially when family routine and surroundings become strange. The idea of leaving familiar people and places will be upsetting, so be patient. Talk with them about moving trucks and boxes and let them help with packing and unpacking. Try to establish a normal schedule soon after the move to make the adjustment easier.
 
Elementary school children will worry most about leaving their friends. Visit your children's new school and if they do not wear uniforms, ask if there is a dress code- take a look a t what other students are wearing. Encourage tem to get involved in after-school activities or sports programs to help them re-establish friendships. Reassure them that they will easily fit into their new neighborhood and that it's  is just a matter of time before they make friends.
 
Take your younger children and show them around their new school. Visit the cafeteria, library, gym and their new classroom. Later, trace the route to and from school and familiarize them with their bus stop.
 
Teenagers are the most difficult because a relocation during adolescence imposes additional changes on an already changing young person. The disruption of a ten's social support system can force him to move back into a position of being more dependent on the parents. For teens, regaining a  measure of independence will be critical , and contacts with accepting peers and other adults will be particularly important. A minister, a youth group leader, another teen with common interests, an older adult who wants help with yard work or other chores can provide important links outside of the family.
 
Unless you can move toward the end of a season, don't worry about moving during the school year. Summer moves can actually be more difficult for children to adjust to because neighborhoods can be deserted while children are on vacation or away at camp. School provides a place for children to make friends, and most teachers will try to be more sensitive o your children's needs.
 
Help your children plan a going-away party. Give each guest an stamped envelope with your new address on it to encourage letter-writing.
 
Encourage your children to exchange photos and addresses with friends with whom they want to keep in touch, and possibly allow  a few long distance phone calls with "best friends" after the move to ease the adjustment.
 
Help arrange and decorate the children's rooms immediately. If you can get the kids settled, everything else will go more smoothly.
 

 
The following special publications are available upon request from our Relocation Resource Center:
 
Kids "on the move". A 32 page booklet which teaches parents exactly how to help their children before, during and after move. Practical suggestions fro kids from kindergarten thru college are provided in question and answer format.
 
Teen Talk.  Straight Talk About Moving, One Teen to Another.
Teenagers are of the utmost concern to relocating parents. This will help  teens and parents with practical advice about new schools, new friends and adjustment in general. The tone is upbeat and shows teens how relocation helps them gain confidence in future endeavors.
 
The House That Waited.  Little Children are often overlooked during a move because of the heavy demands upon parents. This little coloring book is all their own with a delightful story to help them express their feelings so that they can look forward to the move.
 
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 10.8 million movers each year are under the age of 18; 3.4 million of these are preschoolers.
 

Source: Mobility Magazine

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Packing for your move
Packing is both art and science. Art in combining just the right items in each box to arrive damage-free, science in producing an inventory that enables you to quickly find anything you need at a moment's notice after arriving in your new home. Some helpful hints:
 
  Pack to unpack. When possible, combine items that will go together in your new home.
  Pack heavy items in smaller, heavy-duty cartons.
  Use vertical and horizontal dividers fro glassware and other fragile items of similar size.
  Clearly mark room destination on TOP and at least ONE SIDE of every carton.
  If you plan to unpack over several weeks or more, make a complete inventory of the contents of each carton, and number clearly all cartons to be opened sometime later.
  Pack tools needed for immediate use in your new home, in a single carton and mark all sides, top and  bottom clearly. This carton should be marked "TOOLS: Last Packed-First Unpacked".
  Make sure your tool carton is either moved by you or is the  last carton on and the first carton off the mover's truck.
  Remember, your mover wont know which child is which, so tag bedroom boxes with BR-1 or BR-2 and tape the same tags on appropriate bedroom doors.
  Don't forget to make privacy preparations for you first night in your new home and clearly mark cartons containing shades or blinds
  Don't pack your moving inventory. Carry it with you to the new home.
 
RECORDS, VALUABLES, NOTIFYING UTILITIES
Gather records and memorabilia and make plans to move them as carefully as possible, including:
  family medical and tax records
  diploma's, school records
  family genealogies, pictures
  business, social organizations
  other memorabilia
 
If your move is across town, you may want to move those things yourself on the day of the move. If you're moving across the country you may need another option:
 
Financial instruments , jewelry, coins, etc. may be shipped bonded carrier and fully insured, but you must have an itemized inventory detailing their condition and value. Ask your mover for details.
 
Notify utilities, media and others
Make contact at least one month before the move with utilities on both ends of your move.
√ Check this list of businesses to be notified.
 
  ELECTRIC POWER COMPANY
  NATURAL GAS SUPPLIER
 WATER COMPANY
  LOCAL TELEPHONE COMPANIES
  CREDIT CARDS, BANKS
  STOCK BROKERS, MUTUAL FUNDS
  MAGAZINES, BOOK CLUBS
  LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE COMPANY
  RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS
  BOAT, SPORTS CLUBS
  CABLE TV COMPANY
 
Keep in mind that most publications require at least six weeks notice for change of address. Let your neighbors, local schools (if you have school age children) and religious institution know how and where to contact you.
 
TAX DEDUCTIONS
You may be able to deduct some of your moving expenses when you file your Federal income tax return. And, you may have additional tax liability for reimbursement by your firm for items left in your prior residence, or negotiated in the sale of the property.
 
Talk early in the moving process with your accountant and/or attorney, before settling a financial agreement with your firm if moving at company request and expense.
 
Since IRS regulations change with some frequency, review your individual situation before the move and, by all means, keep accurate records and every receipt for all moving related expenses (and reimbursements).
 
Give records, receipts and a profit/loss summary on the sale and /or purchase of properties to your accountant in adequate time for analysis prior to the tax deadline.
 
Call your local IRS office for a copy of the IRS Publication 521 and Form 3903. If you qualify, you may be able to deduct expenses for:
costs for moving household goods and personal effects
costs for moving family pets
travel and lodging costs  related to the move, including meals
mileage costs
 
YOUR MOVING CALENDAR
Moving is a process that takes place over a period of six to eight weeks...or more! During each of those weeks there are decisions and activities that you can complete to make yours an easy move while shill conducting your business and enjoying family and friends.
 
Don't try to cram the entire move into either your final 2-3 weeks at the old address or into an already overloaded schedule - without sharing the responsibility within the family. Most of the hassle and much of the discomfort of your move can honestly be minimized  by pre-move planning.
 
Spread your moving-related preparation and work over the six to eight week period and follow the Moving Check List in this issue to help make your family's move a positive family experience and an easy move for every member of your family.
 
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Moving Checklist
One Month Before Moving
Fill out Change of Address from Post Office
Fill out IRS change of Address Form
Make arrangements with moving company or reserve moving truck
Make travel arrangements, if necessary, with airlines, buses, car rental agencies and hotels
Transfer memberships in churches, clubs and civic organizations
Obtain medical and dental records, e-rays and prescription histories. Ask doctor and dentist for referrals and transfer prescriptions.
Set up bank account in new city
Check into the laws and requirements of your new city regarding home-based business, professional tests, business licenses and any special laws that might pertain to you.
Take inventory of your belongings before they're packed, in the event you need to file an insurance claim later. If possible, take pictures or video tape your belongings. Record serial numbers of electronic equipment.
Make arrangements for transporting pets
Start using-up food items, so that there is less to pack and possibly spoil
 
One to Two Weeks Before Moving
Switch utility services to new address. Inform electric, disposal, water, newspaper, magazine subscription, telephone and cable companies of your move.
Arrange for help on moving day
Confirm travel reservations
Reserve elevator if moving from condo
Have appliances serviced for moving
Clean rugs and clothing and have them wrapped for moving
Plan ahead for special needs of infants
Close bank accounts and have your funds wired to your new bank. Before closing be sure there are no outstanding checks or automatic payments that haven't been processed.
Collect valuables from safe-deposit box. Make copies of any important documents before mailing or hand carry them to your new address.
Check with your insurance agent to ensure you'll be covered through your homeowner's or renter's policy during the move.
Defrost freezer and refrigerator. Place deodorizer inside to control odors.
Give a close friend or relative your travel route and schedule so you may be reached if needed.
 
On Moving Day
Double check closets, drawers, shelves, attic and garage to be sure they are empty
Carry important documents, currency and jewelry yourself, or use registered mail.
 
Arriving at your New Home
Renew your driver's license, auto registration and tags
Shop around for new insurance polices, especially auto coverage.
Revise your will and other legal papers to avoid longer probate and higher legal fees
Locate the hospitals, police stations, veterinarian and fire stations near your home.
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Moving With Pets
Cats and Dogs If you take your pets in your car remember to take along Food, Water, A leash for letting your pet out of the car, and Newspaper or sheets to keep your car clean. Animals can get car-sick and will require frequent stops along the way. Also, check ahead to see if the hotel where you are staying allows pets. Depending on the animal's temperament and size, it might be better to have it shipped by air. Be sure to check if your destination has any local requirements or restrictions on animals.
 
To have your pet shipped by air, make sure someone can meet your pet at the destination airport and take care of it until you arrive. A kennel can do this for you and keep your pet until you have completed your move, if necessary. If you are flying to your new destination, your cat or dog can ride in the baggage compartment. You may need a Health certificate which can be obtained from your veterinarian. A pet container and tranquilizers to be given to your pet immediately before going to the airport. Your pet can be comforted by having a piece of cloth with your scent on it.
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If you're a single parent
Be Positive about your new environment. Children pick up parent's attitudes.
 
Try to keep the family schedule as normal as possible. Stress often comes with change, but maintaining structure will help give your child the extra security needed in the new surrounding.
 
Take your child with you when you call on new neighbors. This is a good way to meet new peers.
 
Take your child to visit the school, meet the principal, secretary, counselor and teachers. There should be a familiar person for the child to seek out in case of a problem.
 
Be willing to seek academic tutoring for your child immediately if the new school subjects are dramatically different. It is hard on the child's morale to be behind the peer group. Additional encouragement and praise is needed.
 
Ask school personnel and/or neighbors about the availability of car pools or public transportation for your child's activities.
 
Ask open-ended questions and then be available to listen to your child  either after school, at mealtime or bedtime. Children need to be able to share what they are experiencing in the new environment.
 
Sign your child up for one or two activities, sorts, or lessons, so that new peer relationships can be fostered.
 
Encourage your child to invite new acquaintances to our home when you are there. It will provide you with an opportunity to meet ant observe new friends.
 
Try to meet the parents of your child's friends. You will get a better perspective and know if you want our child in that parent's home.
 
Allow your child a certain amount of "quiet time" with no commitments. Relocating takes a lot of energy and children need time to internalize the changes.
 
Plan mini adventures in the new city to discover parks, ice cream shops, the library, theaters and whatever else your child may be interested in. A feeling of familiarity will bring confidence and eventually foster independence.
 
Allow your child to buy some of the things common to the area such as a skate board, special bike or clothing items that may not have been "necessities" in your previous home, if possible.
 
Encourage old friends to visit an let your child return to your previous home when invited. Children need to visit and talk to friends and relative from the past to maintain their roots.
 
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Child Care
"Buddy System" - try to find another single person as a "buddy" who can cover for you in an emergency (a neighbor, co-worker, or friend) as soon as possible. This service is usually exchanged without cost as long as neither party takes undue advantage of the other.
 
Try to get to know the person well in a short time. What is their home/apartment like? Is it similar to yours in cleanliness, etc? Are your moral values similar? Is your style of parenting comparable? Are you and your child comfortable with the buddy's child/children? Would you trust the buddy's judgment in an emergency?
 
Daytime Child Care - Check out licensing but especially check references. Talk to parents using the facility. Drop in unexpectedly more than once. Look at play areas inside and out, bathroom, rest areas, kitchen, etc.
 
Local churches or synagogues are often good sources of child care. Many of them have centers on-site. They also  often have weekly bulletins in which you can advertise for sitters. Parishioners often place ads looking for children to care for. Don't' necessarily exclude dominations other than your won. Often the best situation for your child may exist right in your neighborhood and most of these centers are interdenominational in their child care programs.
 
CHECK HOURS - TRY TO FIND A FACILITY THAT ALLOWS FOR THE OCCASIONAL TIMES YOU MIGHT HAVE TO GET TO WORK EARLY OR STAY LATE.
 
Drop-in Child Care - many cities now have child care centers that are for occasional "drop-in" only. They are more expensive than full-time care, but they are wonderful for spur-of-the-moment care of late night occasions.
 
Latch Key Program - some school systems provide extended hours both before and after school for child care within the school facility. Sometimes there is a charge for this service, but it is usually quite minimal.
 
Click here to find a website that can help you find a babysitter service provider as well as a nanny, pet sitter, tutor, daycare service and house sitter.

Here's one more link that may help with finding child care.

 
IN ANY TYPE OF ARRANGEMENT, BE SURE TO TAKE YOUR CHILD ALONG SO THAT YOU CAN SEE HOW THE CHILD REACTS TO THE STAFF AND ENVIRONMENT IN THE CARE FACILITY.
 
 
ALLOWS SOME TIME EACH WEEK FOR YOURSELF.  IT'S A MUST!
 
CONSIDER A CERTAIN TIME AS YOUR APPOINTMENT WITH YOURSELF. PLAN CHILD CARE IN ADVANCE OR EXCHANGE WITH YOUR "BUDDY" ON A  REGULAR BASIS.
DO WHATEVER MAKES YU HAPPY. EXERCISE, SLEEP, SHOP, READ, WRITE LETTERS, ETC. DO WHATEVER GIVES YOU A SENSE OF WELL-BEING.
 
THIS IS ESSENTIAL FOR YOUR ALL AROUND GOOD HEALTH!
 
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